Coffee Log, Day 169

Hi.

Coffee: Fair Trade Five County Espresso Blend, Trader Joe’s Brand

Blue Raspberry lollipop – it turned your whole mouth blue. Nephew of my coworker, the women show you off. Your mom was a drinker but you changed that. Your aunt talks tense phone-calls to laughter. Your friend – another coworker – has a strong southern accent.

How will you talk in 2035? You’ve got good parents, blond hair, blue eyes, but if you’re lucky – if we’re all lucky – those marks won’t have the same cache’ they do today. Will you spend fourth grade watching that one girl from the back of class, only to grab her hand in the lunch-line and kiss it, only to tell her that means you’re married, only to tell your parents and hear them laugh it off like ‘That’s what young men do.’ Will they teach you abstinence or responsible love?

In history books, white western men sin in the 100’s, fight in the 1000’s, conquer through the 21st century; they fight, kick, scream, spill blood until their hands are sticky enough to never drop the reigns. They don’t love, except voraciously; they don’t cry, except pathetically.

You walked behind the counter to get another lolly. I was there. I said: “High Five!” You were static smiles, so much innocent joy it got stuck on me. We smacked palms then you went running. I hope I gave you something. I spent twenty years making love to ill-gotten power, the next ten making up for that. I’m still making up for that. I hope you felt: brave; storied; vulnerable; open; powerless. I was born in the twilight of western white manhood. I’m fighting daily to make sure it dies. I hope you’ll never have to look at your naked limp body in the mirror and pick it down to honest sinews, take scalding showers to wash your grandfather’s sins. I hope you get to choose a good man, an honest man, an equitable man from the beginning.

Currently Reading: LaRose, Louise Erdrich

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“It is strange,’ he said at last. ‘I had longed to enter the world of men. Now I see it filled with sorrow, with cruelty and treachery, with those who would destroy all around them.’
‘Yet, enter it you must,’ Gwydion answered, ‘for it is a destiny laid on each of us. True, you have seen these things. But there are equal parts of love and joy.” – Lloyd Alexander, The Black Cauldron
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Coffee Log, Day 151

Hi.

Coffee: India Extra Bold Roast, Cafe Crema

The first rock concert I went to was Deerhoof. Their drummer beat a snare like it was a dusty mattress. The next rock concert I went to was Bomb the Music Industry! There were twenty of us total in the audience, the band played a long set and collaborated with the openers, I saw them two more times after. The best rock concert I’ve been to was Cinemechanica. When the drums hit at twenty seconds into Brain Tarp the whole room’s sweating; when they hit at forty, you’re impossibly alive.

I don’t listen to rock much anymore. The world changed. There’s not much room to hide a vital, hope-filled aggression behind the heavy wet rock of abysmal news. The 60’s and 70’s fought a battle they thought they could win. They won significantly, then their victories were purchased by the same powers they fought against. Every hipster cafe sells rainbow-colored bracelets and shirts that say ‘Girl Power.’ Meanwhile, the Equal Rights Amendment still hasn’t been ratified.

2018’s a cynical year. We’re aware of the wounds and see the maggots crawling out of them; no room for power chords, just electronic whimpers. But that’s a good thing. Sex, Drugs, and Rock&Roll were just a replacement Patriarchy. In the dead-grip vise of oppression, plug your ears with beats from your favorite rapper or wails from a folk guitar. Do the real, hard, honest, bloody work.

Currently Reading: LaRose, Louise Erdrich

Support Relief for Family Suffering at the BorderRAICES DONATION CAMPAIGN

“We’ve got a paralyzed case of too much choice.” – Cinemechanica, Brain Tarp

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